You may have thought I was a vegetarian . . .

. . . but a few weeks ago we bought a cow with 2 other families and had it butchered. This was an all day project, but still a fun thing to be a part of. We can buy meat by the kilo at the market, but it’s not very appetizing because the meat just sits out on tables outside all day. If you want to get fresh meat, you have to go early in the morning, which I never feel like doing. Even if I did go early, I just don’t know if I trust that meat. So we don’t eat a lot of meat, which may have caused some of you to think I’m a vegetarian. Really I’m a former vegetarian who is lazy and inexperienced with meat.

Here’s how the day went:

Early in the morning, James and a friend went to get the cow. It was raised pretty well. Most cows here graze on whatever they can find, which isn’t much this time of year. They’re organic and grass fed, but they could be fed more . . . Our cow was actually fed and it was young, so it’s meat wasn’t so tough.

We hired a butcher to come butcher the cow, which he did very well and humanely. Then James sold the parts we didn’t want (head, guts, etc . . .) to a neighbor while a friend split the beef into types of cut. Then the kitchen crew (including me) weighed, cut, ground, and packaged the meat. I was really grossed out at the beginning of this part, but I’m proud to say I managed.

That evening we ate smoked ribs at one of the other family’s homes. They even made a meat smoker contraption! I made a barbecue sauce for the ribs that turned out really well. I had never made barbecue sauce before, but I’m always up for a cooking challenge. The sauce was good, but probably not worth the effort if you’re in the U.S., where you could just order Gates sauce from Kansas City or Rudy’s sauce from Austin, Texas. I’m sure there are good bbq sauces available at grocery stores too, I just don’t know what they’re called.

The next day I made broth from the beef scraps and bones. I learned that the longer you simmer the bones in the broth, the more goodness you get out of them – good flavor, texture, and nutrients. I simmered the broth for about 15 hours with onion, carrots, and some spices.

After you make broth, you’re supposed to let it cool so that the fat solidifies on the top and can be removed. I saved this fat, melted it, strained it, and simmered it until the water was all removed in order to make tallow. I don’t know much about using tallow, but I do know that it makes a great pie crust for chicken pot pie!

So, for the next few months, I will probably be posting a lot of recipes including beef and beef broth. I hope my vegetarian readers won’t mind. Don’ worry, there will still be vegetarian recipes in the future.

This is the recipe I used for the BBQ sauce: Kansas City Barbecue Sauce recipe

I followed the recipe except for:

  • I used less steak sauce than called for because I was finishing off a bottle. I used HP Sauce, but the recipe probably had A1 in mind.
  • I used nam oi (local raw cane sugar) in place of the molasses and half of the brown sugar.
  • I used lime juice instead of lemon.
Advertisements

One response to “You may have thought I was a vegetarian . . .

  1. This reminds me of my years processing and then canning venison. I also saved the broth after cooking the bones for hours, stained it and then canned it for use later in soups. I loved the fat free, low/no salt, using very possible part of the venison aspect of the process.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s